Archive for April, 2011

Easter: Jewish Zombie Day

April 24, 2011

Easter– a bizarre combination of superstition, astronomy, and astrology. It is celebrated on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox.

The vernal equinox is a legitimate astronomical marker, important to primitive hunter gatherers and early farmers.  I can understand celebrating and remembering that.

The “first full moon” is less important, other than astrologically. That particular full moon is no more or less important than any other, but I suppose the additional light at night was more important at one time than it is today.

The significance of Sunday is strictly superstitious.

The whole holiday is a mix of ancient pagan religions and stories sewn together into a Frankenstein’s Monster of a holiday by Christianity to celebrate their Jewish zombie. Scary.

You could just celebrate the arrival of spring without making up lies about it, couldn’t you? Celebrate it on time, though, instead of over a month late.

Either way, watch out for the mythical Jewish zombie. He can’t hurt you but his followers are hungry for your brain!

Advertisements

Happy (extremely late) pagan vernal equinox celebration

April 24, 2011

A religion is dangerous in proportion to how much political power it has.

Political power is always very dangerous because no one is perfect.

Religions are always dangerous because they are a choice to ignore reality for superstitions that make you feel good or “chosen”.

When you combine the two- look out!

When Christianity began it had no political power and was not very dangerous (beyond the basic denial of reality). Then it gained political power and The Inquisition happened. Now it has lost most of its former political power and is fairly harmless again, but less so in the US than in most other places.

Islam is most dangerous where it has political power. That’s why Christianity is more dangerous to the average American at home than Islam is.

Both religion and political power should be ridiculed and eliminated whenever possible.  And any attempts to combine the two should be seen as a warning that your life is in grave danger.

How to make better bodies

April 17, 2011

Those who claim humans were made by an all-powerful, all-knowing god should be embarrassed at their god’s sloppy workmanship.  There are some improvements I would make if I were omnipotent and omniscient.

  1. Get rid of toenails.  Seriously, what’s the point?  They are only a problem.
  2. Either eliminate nerves in teeth or make them a lot less sensitive.  Maybe make them capable of feeling pressure but not pain.  And make teeth either replaceable when damaged or self-healing.
  3. Make humans adapt to their diets rather than having to adapt their diets to their evolved needs.  Wouldn’t it make sense to make humans adapt so that Big Macs or bean burritos were the most healthy thing you could eat?
  4. Make eyes endlessly focusable.  From fractions of an inch to infinity.  And obviously correct the horrible inside-out/upside-down error in the eye.
  5. Make hair growth a controllable option.  Don’t want hair?  It doesn’t grow.  Don’t want a beard?  Don’t grow one and never have to shave.  Get a bad haircut?  Choose to grow it out overnight.

There is a lot more I could add, including all the death and disease nonsense and the incompatible drives that alienate the sexes.  But, then, maybe science will fix all this, and more, in the foreseeable future.

“God Said It…”

April 14, 2011

Have you ever seen those bumper stickers that proclaim “God said it, I believe it, that settles it!“?

You have no evidence God said “it” or anything else.  Your baseless belief is all over that silly quote.

If God really said it, and you believed in him, that should settle it right there.  You wouldn’t need to believe separately in what he said.

Of course, God said nothing.

A more truthful sticker would say “believe God said it, so I refuse to think any more.

Or “Someone told me God said it, I believe them, that settles it!

It’s a disgusting sticker no matter how you interpret it.